The Herald Net recently published an Op Ed from Mayor Jon Nehring regarding Cedar Grove Compost's handling of the odor problem. The Op Ed states that a group of paid signature gatherers secretly hired by Cedar Grove have been knocking on the doors of residents pushing an independent study to determine the source of the odor problem. Further, the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency (PSCAA) is wanting to hire Odotech to conduct such a study. However, Mayor Nehring adds, Odotech has done at least $200,000 worth of work for Cedar Grove and has a business relationship with them. According to the Mayor, Cedar Grove would rather spend large amounts of money and time on signature gatherers and phone surveys, than working to fix the problem.

We previously blogged about the fines imposed against Cedar Grove for not being able to control the odors. The fines were regulatory in nature, and does not compensate citizens for the nuisance they have experienced. Concerned residents have formed an organization in order to share information with residents, and call for the elimination of the odors.

While I do not currently represent anyone in Washington, I do represent hundreds of similarly situated people around the country in various landfill and transfer station odor cases with the purpose of compensating citizens for the nuisance they have experienced.